The assertion that the pornography industry has always been at the cutting edge of the adoption and exploitation of new developments in communication technology has pretty much reached axiomatic status. Perhaps the most storied example of this is its fateful selection of VHS over the superior Betamax because of JVC’s decision to lower the cost of the tape duplication machines for production companies. But the demands of the porn industry are also often credited for the accelerated adoption of other technologies such as Polaroid photos and Super 8 film; pay per view and interactive TV; camcorder, DVD, and Blu-Ray; World Wide Web, VoIP, e commerce payments, and video chat. Arguably the Internet itself would not have grown so quickly without the bandwidth demanding, low friction, high privacy enablement of porn consumption.

The question at hand (pun intended) is whether the pornography industry will now step up and push the agenda for virtual technologies? Will pornography change from something we view to something we experience? Can augmented and virtual reality expand the way humans communicate and experience their sexuality? What are the technologies that will play a role in this transformation and how will they be used? What will be the social impacts of the availability of these experiences and how will they change society? These are all very heady questions that I intend to explore in this post.

[Warning! This article is NSFW] Read More →

In my previous entry, 08: Mobile AR Hardware Technologies, I discussed the hardware technologies that are converging to enable mobile augmented reality experiences. Software and services are the other components that are crucial to the delivery of mobile AR experiences and I cover both in this post. There are several layers of software involved, some of which have to do with how developers create experiences while the others are about delivering the experience to the user. Services are applications that provide data or information that is consumed by AR applications over a network (i.e. the Internet). This data is much too diverse and vast to be stored on the device so it is made available upon demand. While hardware and software are responsible for rendering the AR experience, it is services that truly bring value to the user. Read More →